096 Tim Hyde on getting organized with a CRM

If you prefer the video…


Tim Hyde on Sales for Nerds

Tim Hyde wasn’t a great student, but was always interested in entrepreneurship. (He failed his Year 11 business assignment.)

In the 90s, he got into IT, coding, and project management. Liked the patterns and predictability of code.

In the late 90s, a friend of his asked him to join what we would now call a social media site– it was a community site for his hometown of Canberra. Tim and his friend tried to sell advertising, which netted them cases of beer, tickets, etc.

However, clients came back saying that their ads didn’t work. Tim noticed that the sales and marketing programs were like software programs– they would get to a certain point and break or crash.

Tim started another business to help firms with digital marketing, and had some connections that turned into clients. (Tim had a friend who spent $50K on a YellowPages ad, and Tim remembers seeing the YellowPages books propping up computer monitors and realizing that marketing was going digital.)

Tim shares some lessons he’s learned, including:

  • When your clients are shifting where they are, you can go with them, or you can go out of business. You need to be where your clients are.
  • Figure out where your best clients hang out (online and off). Know them well demographically and psychographically. What do they do? (Professionally and personally.) And record that in your CRM, so you can find the common attributes.
  • When you understand where your best customers are, go hang out with them. It could be on social media, on the golf course, etc.
  • If people don’t know you exist, they can’t buy from you.
  • You don’t need many new clients. You can focus your efforts.
  • If you have too many prospects, have them apply to work with you.
  • We don’t need massive numbers, we need consistency.
  • If you’ve got a CRM, make sure you take notes, and put them in your CRM. (Amen!)
  • Your CRM is not a cost, it’s an investment, and it’s not a very big investment. But if you don’t use it, it won’t add value for you. (Amen, again, but maybe I’m biased…)
  • A CRM should help you have a deeper relationship with your clients. Think about getting a cheap second monitor to keep your CRM open all the time.

Most of us spend a lot more on our cars than our CRMs. But even our cars require ongoing maintenance and expense. A CRM is like a car for our business– it helps us get somewhere much faster.

We don’t put enough focus on sales and marketing, which deprives our business of oxygen, allowing the business to serve us, instead of us serving the business.

A lot of fear in business comes from not knowing that comes next. That’s why having a predictable system for sales and marketing (and other aspects of business) is so helpful.

Dunbar says we can have about 5 intimate relationships. To have a good relationship with our prospects, we need a CRM.

People want to do business with people who make them feel good and important.


The Wine

Reuben is having a glass of Beau Vignes California Cabernet.

Tim has green tea (it’s 7AM in Australia when we record the episode). “A little early for whisky.”


Where to find Tim

winmoreclients.com.au

LinkedIn

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

Unlike CRMs built for the VP of sales to keep track of a sales team, where contacts are just statistics, Mimiran is built for relationships, networking, and referrals. (See one way Mimiran makes it easier to make introductions along the lines Steve suggests.)


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

095 Steve Ramona on Doing Business with a Servant’s Heart

If you prefer the video…

Steve started working at his parents’ health club when he was 18, and he started picking up tips from some of the clients.

He learned the power of networking and providing value and over time, built a network of thousands of people

Steve learned to offer value, without expectation of getting anything in return by watching what older successful business people were doing with him.

Last year was Steve’s best year ever, because people invite him to work with him.

This sounds great, but how do you make money in the near term?

Go out to your network and find 5-10 people you can campaign for. (Steve has 16 partners like this) and get referral or commission payments in return. If you do this properly, it’s a win-win-win.

(Really helpful if your CRM has fields for ideal clients and referral partners, btw.)

How much time do you spend “networking” vs “working”?

From 0-$1M, you’re hunting and gathering. Meet 10-15 new people every week. Some of those people will introduce you to more people. During COVID, he met 500 new people in less than 2 months.

Steve estimates that about 10% of your overall contact list will be part of your “inner circle” that you really stay in touch with.

When you bring value to that inner circle– say it’s 500 people– your universe changes– you don’t know exactly when or who…

When making introductions, don’t try to sell anybody, just connect people. Keep it short and sweet. You don’t need a 2-3 paragraph referral.

You never know who someone can introduce you to– it’s not just about the sole individual you’re meeting, but about the people they know.

How do you gain the “Networking Superpower”?

Shut up and listen. Don’t just shut up– make sure you’re really listening.

Ask questions.

(Bonus tip that was not part of the episde, but Steve says that hosting a podcast is great practice for asking questions and shutting up and listening.)

Serving is a skill (or you can call it a habit). It’s not hard, but you have to practice.

How can you build this habit if it feels terrifying, especially for introverts?

Write down 3 questions:

  1. what are you challenges?
  2. how long have you been doing it?
  3. what are your goals?

(Don’t like those questions, come up with 3 of your own open-ended questions.)

(Of course, put the answers in your CRM.)

If you’re serving, having something that you can ask for help with, too, so you don’t turn people into takers. (Steve Ramona calls this the “Infinity Loop”, because he has trouble saying “Reciprocity”, which is what Bob Burg calls it. Check out Bob’s Sales for Nerds interview here.)

Can you make every day Christmas for people in your network?

“Short term money is when you sell someone. Long term money is when you build a relationship.”


The Wine

Reuben is having some EQ Sauvignon Blanc from Chile. It was a little early in the day for Steve.


Where to find Steve

Inphone.co/podcast

(You can find my interview on Steve’s Doing Business with a Servant’s Heart here.)

LinkedIn

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

Unlike CRMs built for the VP of sales to keep track of a sales team, where contacts are just statistics, Mimiran is built for relationships, networking, and referrals. (See one way Mimiran makes it easier to make introductions along the lines Steve suggests.)


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

094 Meridith Grundei on Effective Speaking

If you prefer the video…

Meridith Grundei

Meridith was the shy kid in class who didn’t want to speak up. Someone suggested she take acting classes, which meant she got to use a script and be someone else, so she didn’t feel like she was being judged, which built up her confidence. She even got into improv, and taught at Second City. Improv forced her to bring herself into the conversation, and to realize that “messing up” is part of the process. Eventually, she got good enough that she started teaching others to speak. (Although even now, she notices flaws in her delivery– it’s not about being “perfect”.)

Special Tips for Zoom

  • Don’t be lazy– be engaged. (“everyone has resting bitch face”)
  • Show up well-let, alert, nodding, acknowledging, etc. Look alive and engage.
  • If you’re taking notes, tell people.
  • Keep it interactive (this goes for all speaking engagements, but especially Zoom, where there are so many distractions).

A Talk is a Story, Not a Data Dump

Especially for technical people– make sure you’re telling a story. People will only care about the data if they care about the story. But don’t make the story about you, make the audience the hero.

Frances Frei of Harvard Business School talks about the “Triangle of Trust”– Authenticity, Empathy, Logic. You need these 3 things in your communications. Too often, people get stuck in the logic, and neglect the other 2 pieces. (This is similar to Aristotle’s Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.)

Don’t overemphasize your slides! Work on your slides last. (Same thing goes for visuals, props, etc.) For every one, ask yourself if you need it. If they don’t support your story, skip it. You should know your talk well enough that if all the tech fails, you can still deliver your presentation.

Delivering Your Talk

  • It’s your party– host the party you want to have. Want music, colorful visuals, lots of shouting out? Do that…
  • Have a pre-presentation ritual to ground yourself. (Meridith does up to 35 push-ups.)
  • Do not stand behind the podium (try to move the podium to stage right — your right– if possible, so you can occupy center stage) or hug the curtain at the back of the stage.
  • Move with purpose to convey changes in thinking or circumstances, not just fidgeting.
  • Record yourself, if you can. (Don’t practice in front of the mirror– it’s distracting.)
  • Devote as much time as you possibly can for practice. (And practice out loud. Practice the transitions.)
  • You can break your presentation into chunks– for example you may want to practice a 45 minute presentation in 15 minute blocks.

End on a Strong Note

Be as simple as possible with your call-to-action. (“Please find 30 minutes on my calendar. Here’s my QR code. I’ll give you a moment to grab that on your phone.”)

Don’t give them multiple things to do (“go here to connect with me on LinkedIn, here to get on my calendar, here to get my freebie, etc.”)

If you do a Q&A session after your main presentation, don’t let it just fizzle out. Wrap up the Q&A and recap the main idea(s) from your talk and give your call-to-action.


The Wine

Reuben has a glass of Chateau Franc Bigaroux St Emilion Grand Cru 2019, while Meridith, living in New York City, and having consumed her bottle of wine the night before, goes dry.


Where to find Meridith

Catch Meridith’s wonderful podcast that she co-hosts with Joseph Bennett, Are You Waiting for Permission?

Connect with Meridith on LinkedIn and TikTok.

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories so you can hone and share your unique perspective with ideas from a page of content headlines that could serve as a basis for your talk.

Plus, Mimiran makes follow-up a breeze, so staying on top of those busy editors is easy. And lead magnets let you convert your exposure into leads and conversations.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

093 Alistair McDermott on becoming a Recognized Authority

If you prefer the video…

Alistair McDermott on Sales for Nerds

Alistair’s first job out of school was writing assembly code for IBM mainframes, then went to Sun Microsystems to work on their Solaris operating system. (He may be the nerdiest guest we’ve had.)

He didn’t like working for someone else, and started an SEO (Search Engine Optimization) business. (He started a couple of projects on the side, before he quit his job.)

He also took a course on starting a business, and reached out to the teacher, who gave him a hook up for a cheap trade show booth, because another business had backed out at the last minute.

He got a lot of leads at the tradeshow, but didn’t know what to do with them. So he asked for help again, and learned to create offers. (Some of the leads needed SEO, and some needed a website.)

Alistair ended up calling this business Website Doctor (a brand he still uses).

However, he realized he had no specialization. Every project was different. Everything required word-of-mouth.

He started planning a podcast in July 2014 and he launched in April 2021. He didn’t know what audience he was trying to target.

Alistair groups business development strategies for consultants into 3 buckets:

  1. Referrals (how most consultants operate)
  2. Outbound sales (yuck)
  3. Inbound (the Holy Grail for Alistair)

Alistair has worked with a lot of coaches, but Philip Morgan, author of The Positioning Manual for Indie Consultants (great book, btw, and I need to have Philip come) was a key influence that Alistair reached out to ask for help. Phillip helped him niche down, from “Marketing for Consultants” to “the Recognized Authority”.

If you’re a local brand, you don’t need as much differentiation, because you only have local competition. But if you want to compete globally, you need to niche down and become the “recognized authority” in that niche. “If you’re everything to everybody, you’re nothing to nobody.”

If you pick the right niche, there are more than enough clients.

When you niche down, you can become known for what you do, unlike being a generalist. You avoid the blandness of generic content. You avoid the constant learning curve of being a generalist. As a specialist, you can go beyond the surface level, and the people in your tribe, know that you get them and their issue(s). You want to be like the doctor or lawyer who deals with your particular problem all day, every day.

(Don’t like the idea of “niching down”, try “niching up”, the great turn of phrase from podcast guest Ellen Melko Moore.)

Most common specializations are horizontal (problem-based) and vertical (industry-based). Ideally, you do both.

David C. Baker says you should have at least 200 businesses in the market you’re targeting.

Note that you can experiment with your positioning with test campaigns or even just testing when you speak to people.

List your past projects. What was the client’s ability to pay? How much did I like working on the project? What patterns emerge? This is how Alistair figured out how to zero in on consultants.

Alistair’s 5 Steps for better Positioning:

  1. Past Client Analysis
  2. Skills & Interests Assessment
  3. Small Scale Research to validate ideas
  4. Craft Test Positioning (“I help these people solve this problem” or some variation on that, but keep it simple. This also makes it easy to keep a history of your evolving positioning)
  5. Validate and Iterate. Every time someone asks, “what do you do?”, you get a chance to do this.

Then create content, in whatever format you like, aimed at helping your niche solve the big problem you help them solve. This is a great way to market for an introvert, and it lets people arrive “pre-sold”.


The Wine Whiskey

Alistair enjoys some Jameson Crested Irish whiskey (quite a solid pour, I might add, although I didn’t really give him a chance to drink it during the episode).

Reuben has a glass of Rokkosan 12 year old Japanese whisky.


Where to find Alistair

Catch Alistair’s The Recognized Authority Podcast (and check out this episode on Creating Stress-free Consulting Proposals, with yours truly)

LinkedIn.

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories so you can hone and share your unique perspective. Plus, Mimiran makes follow-up a breeze, so staying on top of those busy editors is easy. And lead magnets let you convert your exposure into leads and conversations.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

092 Reuben Swartz on the 2 Step Sales Process for Consultants

If you prefer the video…

For the past few years, I’ve done a December episode where it’s just me, talking about things I’d like to make sure I pass on, because I found them so useful (and because it typically took me way too long to figure them out).

In this episode, I talk about boiling the complexity of sales and marketing down to a simple 2 Step Sales Process.

This is specifically for folks in relationship business– if you’re in ecommerce or groceries or other more transactional markets, this is not for you.

If you’re in a relationship business, you’re in a conversation business, because conversations are the building blocks of relationships.

So if you’re in one of these businesses, here’s your 2 step sales process:

  1. Figure out exactly who you want to have conversations with.
  2. Have conversations with them.

That’s it.

If you do that, good things will happen. If you don’t, it will be more of a struggle.

Check out the episode for more details, naturally, and check out these additional resources.

Give it a shot and let me know what happens. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised…


The Wine

Reuben has a Loire Valley Pinot Noir from Domaine Vacheron in Sancerre.


listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories so you can hone and share your unique perspective (in other words, figure out exactly who you want to talk to). Plus, Mimiran makes follow-up a breeze, so staying on top of those busy editors is easy. And lead magnets let you convert your exposure into leads and conversations.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

090 Erica Holthausen on turning expertise into authority by publishing in magazines

If you prefer the video…

Erica Holthausen on Sales for Nerds

Publishing a book is a great way to turn your expertise into authority (see this episode with Rusty Shelton for more details), but you don’t have to go all the way to a book to gain many of the benefits.

Erica Holthausen will show you how to publish articles in magazines and journals to raise your profile and attract ideal clients.

Erica was a recovering lawyer, turned marketer, who realized with the help of a business coach, that her true passion was helping her clients get published. She talked to other editors and consultants and realized that this could be her business.

In this episode, Erica outlines her methods so you can get published.

First, who should try to get published?

  • Anyone in an oversaturated market who needs to differentiate themselves.
  • Anyone who wants to build a reputation and personal brand.
  • People who have an idea that they want to spread.

Why don’t people do this?

  • Publication guidelines tend to be clear as mud.
  • Most online resources are for freelancer writers, not experts trying to publish.

And some people should not pursue this path.

  • If you need revenue ASAP, don’t waste time trying to get published– it’s a long term play.
  • If you’re only trying to publish for the SEO boost. There are more effective ways to boost SEO rankings. (Although SEO improvements are a nice side benefit. Note that if SEO is an important focus, look for publications that give you an author blurb with a link on every article, not just a link to your author page.)

If you do want to pursue publishing, (in magazines and journals), here’s what to do…

  1. Consider your goals. Publishing will not magically make money fall from the sky. It’s a part of your business strategy. (One of Erica’s clients wrote articles in an industry journal for individual prospects. Others write content that they don’t even expect their prospects to read– but the credibility boost opens doors. Others want to interview key players in their industry.) Your target publications will depend on your goals, and of course who you’re trying to reach. Often, industry publications are more effective for reaching prospects than more widely known media properties.
  2. Figure out the rules and guidelines for your target publication(s). Everyone has different guidelines. Some are published (Google “write for us [publication name]” or “author guidelines [publication name]”) and some are not. Some have lots of detail, some don’t. But make sure you understand what you can (for example, Inc lets you do interview-style articles, while Entrepreneur does not). Do not be “high maintenance”. Editors are already too busy. Consume the content in your target publication(s), which you’re probably already doing.
  3. Write your article. Yes, before your pitch it. This has several benefits.
    1. You know what you’re actually pitching… the ideas may evolve as you write.
    2. You avoid writer’s block and you can submit the content quickly if you get a “yes”.
    3. Unlike a freelance writer, whose business is getting paid to write, you can use this content elsewhere (even your own blog) if editors don’t want it.
    4. Make sure you fact check everything. Be clear and specific. Don’t write “studies show…”. Link to the actual study. (Which of course you have read and understood.)
  4. Submit your pitch (depending on the publication, you can pitch an article and/or a column). Be clear and concise, not clever. These folks are already overworked. Have a subject like “article pitch: [title]”. (Have a good working title.) Explain why this story matters, and why you should write it. The editor doesn’t care about you, but about the audience.
    1. Show how your piece adds to the conversation already happening for that publication. Look for ways your perspective lets you build on other pieces, with “yes, but…”, “yes, and…”, or “no, because…”. Editors are starving for great content and they can’t afford to pay for it. (Just don’t make your article pitch a pitch for you and your services. That doesn’t serve the audience.)
    2. Include relevant credibility boosters– other publications, quotes in other people’s articles, podcast appearances, industry experience, degrees, etc. You don’t need to list everything, but provide third-party validation of your authority to write on this subject.
    3. Conclude with something like, “If I don’t hear back from you, I will reach out to you in 10 days.”
  5. Follow up. Building on the last point– follow up when you say you will. Editors are busy. They inundated with pitches. They may be sick or on vacation. Give the benefit of the doubt. Follow up by forwarding back the original email, so everything is in one place. After 3-5 attempts, conclude with something like, “If I don’t hear from you in 10 days, I’ll assume you’re not interested and will pitch elsewhere.” (Always pitch one publication at a time.) If you get any response at all, call it a win. (“Nice piece, but we’ve got too many article about XYZ for now…”) If you keep getting no response, get help with your pitch. Would you want someone coming on your podcast with that pitch?
  6. Submit. If you actually get a “yes”, submit your article. You can also ask questions if you need help with guidelines at this point.
  7. Leverage your article(s).
    1. Send a link via personalized email to the key circle of people you wanted to read the piece, including mentors, other experts you cited, key prospects, etc.
    2. Send to your newsletter, on social media, your podcast, YouTube, etc. Multiple times. It may be old hat to you, but not everyone will see it each time.
    3. Put an “as seen in” logo on your site. Just make sure it links through to your article or author page. Erica will assume you’re lying if the logo doesn’t go anywhere.
    4. If you got published via pay-to-play, that’s fine, just don’t pretend that you’re the next Brené Brown. That will cost you credibility instead of gaining it.

Of course, if you want and/or need help with any of this, connect with Erica. (See contact info below, including how to register for her free monthly Pitched to Published sessions.)


The Wine

Erica enjoys some Pfeiffer Wines Rock It Like a Redhead Cabernet Sauvignon (“The Rebel”).

Reuben has Chateau Galateau from St Emilion, Bordeaux.


Where to find Erica

Catchline Communications (prices are public). Check out the free monthly Pitched to Published mini training and Q&A, the 2nd Wednesday of the month.

LinkedIn.

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories so you can hone and share your unique perspective. Plus, Mimiran makes follow-up a breeze, so staying on top of those busy editors is easy. And lead magnets let you convert your exposure into leads and conversations.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

089 Rochelle Moulton on not avoiding conversations

“The sooner you can get to a niche, the faster you get to a sustainable, vibrant business, and we don’t feel like we’re on the hamster wheel. Niching is king.”

Rochelle Moulton

If you prefer the video…

Rochelle Moulton

Rochelle Moulton started her career in a big consulting firm, becoming a partner, then left to start her own firm.

She had to learn to consult without having a big name behind her, and then sold this firm to Arthur Andersen (until the Enron implosion destroyed Andersen).

Within Andersen, Rochelle had been coaching accounting partners on selling. She helped subject matter experts build relationships with clients, not just spout off their expertise.

Here’s why they weren’t good at sales:

  • Too focused on their knowledge, “being right”, and sounding smart.
  • Not paying attention to building a genuine relationship.
  • Not putting yourself in the clients’ shoes
  • Talking too fast, too much, or insisting on pitching your pitch regardless of the conversation

Sound familiar?

Later Rochelle went back to work for herself, and started coaching other consultants like she had internally at Andersen.

She had a client who ran a financial consulting firm who kept hiring people who “couldn’t sell”, because the owner wanted people who could listen. They were amazing at winning deals.

“Introverts can be really, really good at sales because they listen.”

Rochelle helps people build market authority– positioning your expertise in a niche with a powerful message. The idea of building authority is that people seek you out, and you do more of the qualification than sales.

Rochelle likes to think in terms of an Authority Spectrum– from low authority, where you have to do a lot of work for each deal, to high authority, where ideal clients are eager to work with you and seek you out.

This is a spectrum, and it’s not that you ever completely stop reaching out to people, but you get more leverage out of higher authority.

This improves sales efficiency, but does not mean avoiding conversations– just that you have conversations with the right people.

If you really don’t want to ever talk to anyone, have a business model that lets people buy by clicking a button. If you want to do high end consulting, you need to talk to people.

If you do this right, you make low to high 6-figures per project, or even low 7-figures, as a soloist.

If you have a good network of referral partners, you can have high-leverage conversations with them, which leads to a stream of high qualify referrals. (There is a danger of over-reliance on a single referral source, so keep building other options.)

Your niche is a combination of your skills, and how you ideally help with those skills.

Often the sophomore year of a consulting business is the hardest, because the initial flow of referrals dries up, and you have to figure out how to get clients and what your niche really means.

“Do not try to avoid having really conversations. It may feel risky or intrusive, but if you have something to offer them, they would probably love to have a conversation, provided it’s not a pitch. You just have to ask…”

Talk to your Authority Circle– the ~150 people who want to help you and you want to help.

If you’re nervous about having these conversations, start with low-hanging fruit, even your next-door neighbor.

Have conversations and listen. Listen to their concerns, their pain points.

Humans are pretty simple.

Reuben: “figure out exactly who you want to talk to, and have good conversations with them, and good things will happen.”

Rochelle: “I’m not gonna argue with that.”

There you have it, folks. Keep talking to people. And make sure you’re listening.


The Wine

Rochelle enjoys some Fess Parker chardonnay from the California Central Coast, while Reuben has some Domaine Guion Cuvée Prestige Bourgueil, a nice cab franc from the Loire Valley in France.


Where to find Rochelle

Soloist Women Podcast

The Business of Authority Podcast (with co-host Jonathan Stark, whose Sales for Nerds episode on ditching hourly billing you can check out here).

Don’t forget to check out her book, The Authority Code: How to Position, Monetize and Sell Your Expertise.

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories. And great ways to help you have more conversations, as Rochelle recommends.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

088 Bridget Hom on hiring and firing the right mental team

“When you’re feeling out of your mind, you’re probably in somebody else’s. And when you’re in someone else’s mind, you’re out of your own.”

Bridget Hom
Bridget Hom

Bridget Hom’s mom was in public relations, her dad was in sales, and they had scheduled family meetings every Sunday, so you might think she was destined for entrepeneurship.

But she started her career as a journalist. And then got a masters in theology, planning on going into the ministry. She realized later that journalism, ministry, and marketing all share a similar theme.

In her twenties, she lived a self-described “bougie” lifestyle with 3 nannies, house cleaners and traveled the world as a stay-at-home mom (“domestic engineer”).

But she got Zoom-divorced and moved into a small apartment with her 3 boys.

She got certified as a coach and met a man while salsa dancing who became her business partner in a placement agency, but that dried up with the pandemic.

Fortunately, that dance partner gave her the best advice she ever receieved:

“Wherever you go, just be you.”

In this episode, learn:

  • How Bridget showed up and started her “Bridge to Freedom Coaching Program” and how you can apply her techniques to your program(s).
  • Why being “Stuck on Ready” (the title of her book, btw) is so important for an entrepreneur. In other words, always be ready to take (imperfect) action, instead of waiting for perfection.
  • To hire and fire the right mental team, before you try to sell your prospects your own limiting beliefs.
  • Why feelings aren’t your friends– action is your friend.
  • How to create empowered referral partners. (Hint, it has a lot to do with some of the core concepts about referrals and conversations in Mimiran.)
  • Why having an ideal client profile is important, but why you shouldn’t get wrapped up in that idea when you start. (And how to figure it out. Hint, it’s really easy, especially with the right (anti)CRM.)
  • Why you need to look and feel “the part”.
  • How to stay accountable and on track (and why a 1% deviation from your course will lead you miles astray). (You do have a destination and a course, right?)
  • To make sure your actions are moving you towards your destination.
  • To address your headspace every single day. Be intentional. Brain dump. Hire and fire the right mental team. (See video below that Bridget mentions.) “As entrepreneurs we’re typically in relationships with our thoughts about people, versus people themselves.”
  • Why if you have an endless todo list, if it’s not digestible each day, you’re going to think you’re a failure every day. Set a 2 minute timer and write for 2 minutes (pen & paper). Then hire & fire the right mental team. Shift negative ideas to positive, with action. For example, if you’ve hired “resentment” on your team, fire that and hire “motivation” or “serenity” and then do something in line with that team member.
  • How to know if and when to actually change course.
  • Why you need to keep having conversations.

“As entrepreneurs we’re typically in relationships with our thoughts about people, versus people themselves.”

What do you think I do? Let people tell you…

Look at your day– do your actions line up with revenue– clients, prospects, prospecting, and content creation.

Is there an even exchange of energy? Especially with collaboration partners. If you’re not talking about profit in your collaborations, you’re not being serious.

Put that energy into your business development.

Be problem aware and solution seeking. Be aware of anything that keeps your from limitless potential. A lot of entrepreneurs have the wrong mental and they don’t reach out to anyone.

Here’s the Juggling with the Jenkins– if my brain had a morning meeting video.

The Book

Stuck on Ready Bridget Hom

Stuck on Ready: Master the Entrepreneur Mindset, Break Free from Self-Sabotage, and Access Your Limitless Potential


The Coffee & Tea

Bridget is in recovery so we’re not drinking alcohol today. Bridget has some coffee, and Reuben having already had his coffee, has moved on to tea.

Which brings us to Bridget’s version of the Serenity Prayer:

“Give me the courage to accept the people I cannot change… the courage to change the people I can, and the wisdom to know that that’s me.”


Where to find Bridget

BridgeToFreedomCoaching.com

LinkedIn.

Brigethom.me (direct calendar link)

https://www.bridgetofreedomcoaching.com/about-4

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories. And great ways to help you have more conversations, as Bridget recommends.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

087 Kevin Whelan on selling your expertise, not your labor

Kevin Whelan

Kevin Whelan was a philosophy major, but he had created a website about computer security in high school, just as a hobby.

Later, that experience led to creating websites as a freelancer and then a job in the marketing group at a law firm, where he saw how digital agencies operated from the client’s perspective.

He also started building an agency in his “spare time”.

Hear how Kevin:

  • Got his first clients
  • Moved from building 4 figure websites to 5 figure websites
  • Increased his productivity and effective hourly rate (without having to bill hourly)
  • Used specialization helped him get better, bigger projects
  • Moved from charging for implementation to consultation to advisory services (actor to director to producer)
  • Handles outsourcing pieces of project delivery, and why he doesn’t take a cut
  • Handles scheduling conflicts between different clients
  • Gives away as much of his expertise as possible, to attract people who appreciate the way he thinks

If you want to move from selling your expertise, to selling the results, don’t miss this episode, and connect with Kevin for more info.


The Wine & Whisky

Kevin is enjoying a Nikka Japanese Whisky (on the rocks).

Reuben has a glass of Youngberg Hill Willamette Valley Pinot Noir.


Where to find Kevin

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):

085 Tom Jackobs on selling with storytelling

Tom Jackobs

Tom Jackobs never set out to be a sales coach. He started a fitness business because fitness had made such a big difference in his life.

Unfortunately, he almost went broke because he didn’t know anything about sales.

Learn how he turned sales from a weakness to a strength, without becoming “sales-y”, by connecting via storytelling.

Storytelling isn’t a new topic for Sales for Nerds, but you’ll appreciate how Tom guides you to find the right stories for you, and how to tell them.

Tom joins from Taipei, where a 2 day layover turned into 3 years and counting, thanks to COVID.

In this episode, learn:

  • How to make sales about solving people’s problems. (No one wants to exercise, they want to lose weight, get in shape, etc.)
  • How he became a sales coach for the company that he hired to coach him in sales.
  • How having a process let him sell without stress and much more effectively.
  • How to use your story and your clients’ stories to help prospects.
  • How you can succeed in sales as an introvert
  • How to pick a story and tell it the right way.
  • Don’t forget to have 3 versions of that story– from about a minute, to about 5 minutes, to a 10-15 minute version, for different situations.

P.s. Here’s part of Tom’s story that made him good at selling personal training:

And if you’d like to watch the episode, here’s the video:


The Water

Due to scheduling challenges between Austin and Taipei, we are both drinking water. 😉


Where to find Tom

listen-on-apple-podcasts-sales-for-nerds

Where to find Reuben

@Sales4Nerds, @Mimiran, Mimiran.com.You can also  listen on Overcast, or Subscribe on Android, or Player.fm.

Want a way to make sales and marketing fun, without being “salesy”? Try Mimiran, the CRM for elite solo consultants who love serving clients but who hate “selling”.

It also has a “mad-libs” style wizard to help you lay our your mission and positioning, including your origin story and customer stories.


Get alerted when there are new episodes (1x/month):